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Posts for tag: Immunizations

By White Oak Pediatrics
October 01, 2018
Category: Pediatrics
Tags: Immunizations  

Find out why regular immunizations are vitally important for your child’s health.

ImmunizationYou might notice that from the moment your child is born that there is a rather extensive list of immunizations that your child needs to stay healthy. Does your child really need all these shots or can they skip some? We know there are many questions parents have regarding vaccinating their children and our Raleigh, NC, pediatricians are here to put your mind at ease.

Are vaccines safe?

This is the number one question on most parents’ minds. After all, there are so many news reports and coverage on vaccines that it can be difficult to know what information to trust. It’s important to understand that millions of children each year receive vaccinations and are completely safe. In fact, immunizations could actually save a child’s life. And if you are still a bit nervous about them, remind yourself that vaccines have undergone rigorous medical testing by scientists and doctors to make sure that they are safe and effective.

Why does my child need to get vaccinated?

There are a host of childhood illnesses out there that has serious and even potentially life-threatening complications. Along with protecting your child against serious infections such as polio, we can also protect others within your family from contracting this same illness by vaccinating your child.

For example, if you have a newborn in your home, they won’t have all their vaccinations yet. By vaccinating older children you can prevent the spread of serious infections to members of your family who can’t yet get vaccinated.

No matter whether you have questions about your child’s upcoming visit and immunizations, or you need to schedule a school physical before the school year begins, the caring team and staff at White Oaks Pediatrics in Raleigh, NC, are here to help. Schedule an appointment with us today.

By White Oak Pediatrics
September 21, 2017
Category: Pediatrics
Tags: Immunizations  

Are your children up to date on their immunizations? The pediatricians at White Oak Pediatrics in Raleigh, NC, share the recommended immunizationimmunization schedule and explain why protecting your children from these diseases is so important.

When should my children receive immunizations?

The recommended immunization schedule is as follows:

  • Hepatitis B: First dose at birth, second dose between 1 to 2 months, 3rd dose between 6 to 18 months
  • Rotavirus: First dose at 2 months, second dose at 4 months
  • Diptheria, tetanus, and pertussis: First dose at 2 months, second dose at 4 months, third dose at 6 months, fourth dose between 15 to 18 months, fifth dose between 4 to 6 years
  • Haemophilus influenza type b: First dose at 2 months, second dose at 4 months, third or fourth dose at 12 to 15 months
  • Pneumococcal conjugate: First dose at 2 months, second dose at 4 months, third dose at 6 months, fourth dose at 12 to 15 months
  • Polio: First dose at 2 months, 2nd dose at 4 months, third dose between 6 to 18 months, fourth doses between 4 to 6 years
  • Influenza: Annually for children 6 months to 18 years
  • Measles, mumps and rubella: First dose at 12 to 15 months, 2nd dose at 4 to 6 years
  • Varicella: First dose at 12 to 15 months, second dose at 4 to 6 year
  • Hepatitis A: First dose at 12 to 23 months, second dose six months later
  • Meningococcal conjugate: First dose at 11 to 12 years, second dose at 16
  • Tetanus, diphtheria and acellular pertussis: Single dose at 11 to 12 years
  • Human papillomavirus: First dose at 11 to 12 years, second dose six to 12 months later
  • Meningococcal b: Single dose at 16 to 18 years

These immunizations not only prevent your children from developing preventable diseases but also protect infants who haven't yet received vaccines and people who can't receive immunizations due to health reasons. According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, studies have shown no link between autism and immunizations. Most children will only experience mild side effects, such as low fevers or irritability, for a day or two after receiving a vaccine in our Raleigh office.

It's never too late for your child to be immunized against common childhood diseases. Schedule your child's immunizations by calling the pediatricians at White Oak Pediatrics in Raleigh, NC at (919) 787-0266.

By White Oak Pediatrics
September 15, 2016
Category: Pediatrics
Tags: Immunizations  

We know that there is a lot to think about when it comes to your child’s health. Learn more about vaccinations and how they can help.

Parent wants to protect their children from illnesses. Of course, it’s nearly impossible to protect them enough that they never get sick;Immunization however, some viruses seem to show up so rarely that parents often wonder if it’s worth getting their child vaccinated in the first place. Learn more about getting immunizations from our Raleigh, NC pediatricians and why your child should be vaccinated.

Q. What is the purpose of immunizations?

A. Whenever your child gets vaccinated this shot is designed to help the body fight against certain serious or potentially life-threatening illnesses. When the vaccine is injected into the body the weakened or dead form of the disease causes the body to produce antibodies necessary to recognize the virus and start attacking it.

What this means for the long-term is that the body has now been exposed to a non-serious form of the virus, so the body knows how to fight it to prevent your child from getting sick in the future. In essence, a vaccine is designed to help children build immunities to certain viruses.

Q. Will an immunization weaken my child’s immune system?

A. No, getting a vaccine will not weaken the immune system, so you won’t have to worry that once your child gets vaccinated that they will become more susceptible to other diseases while building immunity.

Q. Can an immunization give my child a disease?

A. As we mentioned earlier, immunizations are often made from weakened or inactive forms of a virus. Immunizations such as chickenpox or measles are made from a weakened form of the virus, which could cause your child to experience a milder form of the illness; however, what your child might experience with an immunization is significantly less severe than actually being infected with the full-blown virus.

Q. How often should my child be vaccinated?

A. The first vaccination your child should get will be around 2 months old and continue until your child is at least 18 years old. Keeping up with these vaccines will protect your child from severe illnesses. Talk to our Raleigh children’s doctor about the standard childhood vaccine schedule so that you know when your little one needs to come in.

Here at White Oaks Pediatrics in Raleigh, NC we understand that nothing is more important than the health of your child. We couldn’t agree more. Turn to us for the comforting and compassionate care your little one deserves.